Articles > Teenagers and their mental health

Teenagers and their mental health

  • PUBLISHED MON 20:15, 1 OCT 2018
  • |
  • UPDATED MON 20:49, 5 NOV 2018
  • |
  • BY TRACY BOND

How to help your kid if you think they might be becoming anxious or depressed.

We all know that the teenage years can be extremely difficult for thousands of our young people as they begin the transformation into adulthood.

Lots of new pressures suddenly appear which they somehow have to to figure out how to deal with. Pressure due to school and learning new subjects, peer pressures, social media pressures, puberty, the list is long.

I passionately believe our children are our most important assets and it is vitally important for their success in this crazy modern world that they make the most of their education opportunity to maximise their chances of landing a good job with good pay - and, in turn, having a great life.



Mental health issues can be so damaging during the school years and I have another article HERE with more detail on this exact same subject.

So what should you do if you think your child might be having trouble concentrating fully at school due to their mental state?

  1. Make time to talk to them and find out if they are having problems. Bear in mind that not many kids will be prepared to suddently answer probing questions entirely honestly so use your parental instincts to see if they're really as okay as they claim to be.

  2. Make sure that they know you're available to talk to about any issues they may be facing. When they do talk, try to listen without interrupting and without judging. If you feel the urge to offer advice, try to wait until they have told you everything they want to and then pause for a while before giving it.

  3. If the issue persists consider booking a counsellor/mentor for your child. A few sessions with a trained professional can be a transforming experience for a young person and they can be arranged either weekly or monthly.

As a counsellor and mentor myself I cannot stress enough the importance of acting quickly and there are a number of reasons why:

  1. While your child is suffering there is a good chance they will be unable to focus properly on school work and they may easily find themselves dropping behind in class, and their education will suffer, possibly drastically

  2. Unresolved mental health issues can rapidly worsen and become more of a challenge to put right

  3. Worsening mental health issues in teenagers can, in a few extreme cases, have disastrous consequences

I love my work and I have helped over 100 young people over the last 12 years in schools all over Cheshire and Staffordshire as well as with Savana and The Dove service. I now work in private practice from my counselling room in Alsager and have availability for a small number of new clients at present.

If finances are tight there are charities which offer free mental health counselling although there's usually a waiting list. Try North Staffordshire Mind or NHS Mental Health Services; you might be lucky and be able to get an appointment quickly.

If it was my child I'd choose a BACP accredited counsellor from the list on the BACP website, here.

 

 

If you think you might prefer some one-to-one help with any issues you might be facing, the best place to find a qualified, reputable therapist is on the BACP website here: https://www.bacp.co.uk/about-therapy/how-to-find-a-therapist/.

Or, if you're close enough to Alsager you might like to click here to make a booking with me.

 


Please share if you found this article useful